Media Round-up for 28/01/2018

This might be one of the oddest combinations for reviews I’ve come across in a long time: a collection of Oprah’s columns from her magazine and a hentai game.  Oh well, we all know I like trying a little of everything!

Oprah Winfrey – What I Know for Sure

what_i_know_for_sureWhat I Know for Sure is a collection of Oprah’s columns of the same name, originally published in O magazine.  Each essay is essentially a lesson about something that Oprah has learned for certain over the course of her life and I would say that the tone of the essays is generally inspirational.  What I Know for Sure isn’t the type of book that I would normally reach for, but a YouTuber I follow mentioned that it had been a source of comfort and inspiration to her and, since I am in an excellent position to absorb things that are comforting and inspirational, I thought I would give it a try.

While I did enjoy most of this book, some of the anecdotes made me shake my head at Oprah’s overwhelming privilege.  For example, one of the lessons in the Joy chapter was that one should always look after themselves as carefully as they look after others.  This is a profound idea that can be a struggle for so many of us and the fact that she spends a great deal of time in this book discussing self-care in general is fantastic.  In order to teach readers this particular lesson, however, Oprah employs a story about hiring a famous devotional singer to perform at her birthday party, something she wasn’t willing to do for herself alone and only thought of arranging once she learned that one of her close friends also liked the singer.  Why, Oprah’s friends wondered, couldn’t she have hired the singer for her birthday alone?  Why did she need to do it for someone else rather than doing it for herself?  As I said, the sentiment here is good, but the story is a problem for the wealthy and I found myself rolling my eyes as I read it.

Overall, however, despite a few missteps, several of the chapters of the book were extremely powerful for me, particularly the chapters on Resilience, Gratitude and Connection.  I agree with many of the principles that she discusses, such as the idea that no other person can make you happy if you aren’t happy with yourself, a topic that I spent some time talking about earlier this week.  I also greatly admire Oprah’s commitment to life long learning and completely agree with her when she asks… “when you stop learning, you cease to grow and subconsciously tell the universe you’ve done it all — nothing new for you. So why are you here?”

If you’re into Oprah’s particular brand of radical self love and you like reading inspirational literature, I think that What I Know for Sure is a great book to have in your collection.  I think that this book is best read when you need a short, easy to digest pick-me-up.  If you’re having a bad day, read a column or two and you might find a little extra energy to get on with it.

HuniePop

huniepopIn the video game community, HuniePop is more than a little notorious.  It’s an OEL (original English language) soft hentai game where the player can date and/or sleep with potential anime girl mates by solving match-three puzzles.  I would say that the match-three gameplay is a cross between Bejeweled/Candy Crush and You Must Build a Boat (YMBAB).  The puzzle aspect of the game is well-designed and super fun to play.  At any given time, you can hang out with one of the game’s available female characters (you can play as a male or female protagonist, but all of the dateable characters are female).  You can ask them questions about themselves to earn currency, give them gifts to increase your reputation with them, or you can go out on dates.

The dates are where the match-three puzzles happen.  In order to successfully complete a date, you must match adjacent tiles to earn a set number of points in a set number of moves.  Each colour of tile has a characteristic associated with it and each character has a favourite characteristic, which will yield more points.  If you are able to complete several dates with one character, she will eventually join you at your home and have sex with you which involves a bonus puzzle, some poorly voice-acted moaning and a topless illustration of the character.

All in all, I found HuniePop to be disappointing.  I love romance in video games and the otome visual novel (a romantic choose-your-own-adventure genre aimed at women) is one of my favourite game genres.  Unfortunately, HuniePop lacks the emotional depth that I like to see in romance games and the character interactions consist only of surface-level fan-service.  The characters are poorly developed and the only information you learn about them is similar to what you might find in a profile of a popular boy band member in a teen magazine (height, weight, favourite colour, favourite hobby, etc…).  None of the scenarios I encountered were even remotely romantic or revealed anything deeper about the characters involved.  The game’s only surviving grace is its excellent match-three gameplay.

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